Biosecurity is Key in Preventing Avian Influenza Spread

Now is the Time to Protect Your Flock Against Avian Flu

Center for Poultry & Livestock Excellence Pennsylvania

First Case of HPAI Confirmed in Lancaster County

The highly contagious and deadly avian influenza (HPAI) has been confirmed in Lancaster County, Pa.

Immediate actions are required by the Pa. Dept of Agriculture to stem the spread of this disease.

HPAI Test Sample Submission Instructions

WHO

Poultry companies operating in the control and surveillance zones in
Lancaster County, Pa. should have biological samples collected by:

  1. Company certified poultry technician OR
  2. Personal certified poultry technician OR
  3. Trained HPAI samplers OR
  4. Veterinarian-acquired samples

HOW OFTEN

Location Operation Type Submit

Control Zone
(10km)

Layer operations 48 and then 24 hours in advance of an egg movement
All other operations 48 and then 24 hours in advance of a movement OR weekly if not moving product

Surveillance Zone
(20km)

All operations Weekly through May 2, then every other week

 

WHERE/WHEN

Take your samples to any one of the following sites:

Location Address Hours
Northwest Old Messick’s Store
187 Merts Drive
Elizabethtown, PA
(Off Rheems Exit of Rt. 283)
Monday-Friday
8 am – 10 amFor same day testing
Northeast Landisville Research Farm
1446 Auction Road
Manheim, PA
Monday-Friday
8 am – 10 amFor same day testing
Southwest Lloyd H. Fuhrman Memorial Park
110 Rock Point Road
Marietta, PA
Monday-Friday
8 am – 10 amFor same day testing
Southeast Columbia Crossing River
Trail Center
41 Walnut Street
Columbia, PA
Monday-Friday
8 am – 10 amFor same day testing

 

*If you cannot make it to a site by the cutoff time, you can contact any of the 3 PADLS labs to make a bio-secure drop-off. Failing that, refrigerate your samples for the next drop-off period.

ACTION REQUIRED

If you are in the Control Zone, permits are required to travel within this zone if entering or leaving poultry premises. Farms are required to test in this zone.

If you are in the Surveillance Zone, farms are required to test in this zone.

Contact the Pa. Dept. of Agriculture for sampling requirements.

General Quarantine Order; Virus Control for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Poultry, Poultry Litter, Conveyances, Feed, Refuse, Containers and Material Standards will be published in PA Bulletin in April 30, 2022 but takes effect immediately upon this constructive notice. You can access the Quarantine Order on the PDA website at agriculture.pa.gov under the Avian Influenza tab.

If you suspect HPAI in your flock

Call the PDA hotline immediately. Do not move the birds. There is no penalty for calling and testing for surveillance is free. Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) emergency number 717-772-2852 (press option 1 to reach the veterinarian on call).

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in a flock of commercial layer chickens in Cecil County, Maryland.  According to APHIS, depopulation across the U.S. due to HPAI so far has included more than 275,000 commercial turkeys, 2.6 million commercial broilers or layer chickens, 1.8 million of which are located on two premises located on the Pennsylvania border and in adjoining counites of Delaware (New Castle) and Maryland (Cecil) which border Lancaster and Chester Counties.

During a recent call with stakeholders organized by PennAg, PA State Veterinarian Dr. Kevin Brightbill urged poultry farmers to follow the guidelines set forth in the 2015 Interstate and General Quarantine Order; Virus Control for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Vehicle, Container and Material Standards. The order lays out steps that poultry facilities can take to prevent HPAI and to help stop the spread of HPAI. The restrictions within the order apply to any conveyance or vehicle, container or material, live or unprocessed goods or products of poultry.

Dr. Brightbill also said that calls to the department to report signs of HPAI have increased in recent weeks, though no cases have been detected within the state yet. He also warned that despite no detections, “I still firmly believe it is only a matter of time before we see our first infected flock in Pennsylvania.”

With the recent detections of the HPAI in wild birds and domestic poultry in the United States, bird owners should review their biosecurity practices and stay vigilant to protect poultry from this disease. APHIS has said that it is working closely with state partners on surveillance, reporting, and control efforts.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed multiple cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in birds in multiple states, including Delaware, New York, Maine, Michigan, Virginia, Iowa and Kentucky.

In addition to practicing good biosecurity, the USDA encourages bird owners to prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and asks the bird owners report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to state and federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through APHIS’ toll-free number, 1-866-536-7593. APHIS strongly suggests that owners bring birds indoors, when possible, to further prevent exposures.


APHIS has materials about biosecurity, including videos, checklists, and a toolkit available here.

For more information on confirmed cases and background information on Avian Influenza, click here.

For more information, resources, and the latest developments in the fight against HPAI, go to the Penn State Extension, here.

Minimum Biosecurity Requirements for Feed Mill and Feed Delivery Trucks

April 25, 2022
Penn Ag

 

These biosecurity requirements must be followed if:

  • The feed mill is within a Control Area for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) AND/OR
  • The poultry farm receiving a feed delivery is within a Control Area

FEED MILL:

  • The feed mill must have a wild bird and rodent control program which includes regularly cleaning spilled feed.

PERSONNEL:

  • Feed truck drivers must not enter any poultry house and must remain outside for the connection to the feed bin.
  • Feed truck drivers should not own or interact with birds of any kind, including backyard or pet birds.
  • Drivers must disinfect footwear (e.g., Lysol) prior to entering the truck at the feed mill.
  • Drivers must wear disposable boot covers or disinfect footwear prior to exiting the truck. If wearing disposable boot covers, remove before re-entering the truck. Whether wearing boot covers or not, always disinfect footwear prior to entering truck.
  • Disposable boot covers must be discarded at the farm or feed mill prior to re-entering the vehicle.
  • Hands must be sanitized when entering the truck at farms and feed mill.
  • Interior of truck cabs (e.g., floorboards, pedals, steering wheel, gear shifts, door handle) must be disinfected before leaving the farm and at the feed mill.

FEED DELIVERY TRUCKS:

  • Feed trucks must have a full truck wash with soap and water at least weekly with no organic debris remaining.
  • The undercarriage of feed trucks must be cleaned with soap and water at least daily with no organic debris remaining.
  • Trailer lids on feed delivery trucks must be kept closed except when loading or sweeping after unloading. This minimizes the potential of bird droppings falling into the feed or trailer.
  • A disinfectant* log must be maintained for each truck (see example disinfectant log).
  • Truck and trailer undercarriage disinfection includes complete saturation and at least 2 complete tire rotations or 1 minute of disinfection pump “on” time, using an approved disinfectant effective against Avian Influenza prepared and handled according to product label directions.
    • When exiting the feed mill, the undercarriage of trucks and trailers (including tires, wheel wells, mud flaps and cab entry steps) must be disinfected.
    • When entering poultry farms for feed delivery, the undercarriage of trucks and trailers (including tires, wheel wells, mud flaps and cab entry steps) must be disinfected.
    • When exiting poultry farms, the undercarriage of trucks and trailers (including tires, wheel wells, mud flaps and cab entry steps) must be disinfected.
    • When entering the feed mill, the undercarriage of trucks and trailers (including tires, wheel wells, mud flaps and cab entry steps) must be disinfected.
  • Minimize the delivery of split loads (i.e., delivery to multiple farms without returning to the feed mill).
  • Permitted feed delivery to any infected premises requires a complete cleaning and disinfection of the truck and trailer prior to leaving the premises.

* Disinfectants must be approved and effective against avian influenza

Attachments: Feed Mill Truck Disinfection Log, Minimum Biosecurity Requirements